The Second Best Thing I Learned Before Being Published

While finding a writing mentor was the most impactful factor in my path to publication, learning to obtain good editing was the second most important key to my success. Even more challenging than locating a talented editor was finding the right editor for me, and it wasn’t until that editor/writer relationship was fully evolved did I realize how essential it was for my growth. A good editor not only helps shape my story, he lets me know what I do well and where I need work.

During my twenty-year journey in the publishing industry, I’ve watched the job of proper editing being pushed down from the publishing houses, through the agent’s office (if you are lucky enough to have a good one), and to the author’s desk. While some editing has always rested with the author, a gradual increase in responsibilities has occurred until today where virtually everything but copy editing is thrust upon the author.

This is both frustrating and empowering. While proper editing requires a great deal of work and vigilance, the author has large control over who edits his work. And remember, an author cannot edit his own work. No writer can, and no successful author does. He cannot be completely objective regarding his strengths and weaknesses and what needs to be done with the story at hand.

So the two primary questions are: What does a good editor do? And how do you find one? I’ll offer some advice.

First of all, anyone can offer an opinion of your work, and they will, even if you don’t ask. Anyone with an English degree or even a published book can hang a shingle and offer editing services. However, an unskilled opinion, of which there are many, and the wrong editorial sensibilities can damage your work in progress, not to mention your course and psyche as a writer. Most opinions of your work should be reserved for street commentary on the Internet, and much of it has the value of gum stuck to your shoe.

The right editor will understand your genre, as well as the specific work at hand. There is no exception here. You do not want a great romance editor working on your fantasy novel or biography. While her talents as an editor may span pages, she must be able to prove her experience with actual published books within your genre as the result of her labor. She must also be able to provide references from the authors of those books. Read those books. Talk to those authors. Ask what the editor did for them and what the editor concentrated on during the process. If a prospective editor has little relevant experience, she brings nothing to the table that you can use as an author.

A good editor will understand you and what you need. Like a psychologist, editors tinker with the soul of your work. She must understand you as a person, what you are trying to accomplish, and have the patience to guide you toward the discoveries you need, no matter where you are in the artistic growth process. Schedule a conversation or a series of interviews to see if you want to work with a specific editor. Provide a sample chapter in order to view both her skill and her methodology as an editor. It is perfectly acceptable to pay for sample editing. Do not sign a contract for a long work unless you are completely comfortable and confident that this editor will help you.

Hiring an editor creates both a business and personal relationship that often extends beyond the book itself and lasts for years. For my first four published novels, I returned to the same editor over and over, and each time he was more insightful about the work and me as a writer. In fact, what I was trying to accomplish as a writer was first articulated, not by me, but by my trusted edited. A lover won’t identify your fingerprints as well. A talented editor that understands your work is worth his weight in books and will likely be a long-time friend and advocate for your work.

Useful articles on the logistics of finding an editor:

Christopher Klim is the author of several books including the novel, Idiot!, and the short collection, True Surrealism. He is currently working on a novel trilogy about the space program past, present, and future. See his popular series on publishing: The Book Killers.

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