Should You Purchase Social Media Friends and Followers?

Recently we noticed a competitor had a large number of Facebook friends and Twitter followers, but when we looked closer using a few of the common Internet analysis tools, we discovered that the overwhelming majority of these friends and followers were inactive accounts, nearly 85%. While it’s possible that these followers compose the dullest collection of people in the world, it is more likely that these followers were purchased and are therefore utterly worthless.

We’ve all seen the ads to purchase social media friends and followers. You cannot have a Twitter account without encountering the vendors who promise 10,000 followers for around $100. It’s very enticing to suddenly boost your numbers to amazing levels, but these vendors are predominantly selling connections to accounts that are not regularly monitored, probably not ever, and not by people who are actually interested in you. Mostly these are dummy accounts, designed to prop up social media numbers. The industry refers to these as “fake followers.”

Some level of fake followers will always be connected to your social media accounts. It’s unavoidable and typically in the single digits, but let’s examine the reasons why you should not purchase social media followers.

Integrity: While it’s deceptive to fool your friends and family, it is unethical to sell goods and services on the illusion of popularity. Many customers flock toward apparently popular market choices. When a rock band, for example, boosts their profile with a fake following, it’s a dicey decision that may or may not pay off with increased attention, but when a buyer’s purchase decision hinges on the seller’s ability to reach other people, such as boasting a large Twitter audience, deceiving the buyer with a fake audience is illegal.

Reputation: Organic social media growth is difficult, requiring a relentless dedication to providing useful and/or interesting content. There’s no cheating this factor. Large numbers of fake followers will be discovered. People will notice your anemic discussion rate—low percentages of replies, re-posts, and re-tweets, etc. On your social media timelines or by using any of the available Internet analysis tools, informed people will uncover the sudden burst and subsequent drop in new friends and followers, which coincides with the time you purchased your fake fan base. Moreover, customers will notice that they aren’t getting the anticipated public relations push because your social media followers aren’t real people.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO): Not only will you not be able to trend on Facebook and Twitter, which is something we covet above most social media efforts, search engine algorithms will spot your fake audience and penalize your rankings via their ever-present and omnipotent SEO. You can buy a social media following, but you cannot make it do anything. It’s a dead beast, and search engines will drive past it on the digital highway.

Publicity scams go back as far as biblical times, but the short term gain never outweighs the eventual damage. Buying a fake audience will hurt you in the long run, while attracting a following through concrete value will achieve legitimate results. For example, if you liked this article, you might consider following us on Twitter, subscribing to our blog, or requesting a book review. Thank you.

There are many social media auditing tools to choose from. According to TwitterAudit.com, here are some statistics for the top Tweeters:

@BarackObama, 51% fake

@JustinBeiber, 48% fake

@KimKardashian,  44% fake

@TheEllenShow, 36% fake

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Fake Social Media: More Common Than You Think

Since we last discussed the issue of fake social media followings, some of our competitors have gotten even worse, falling into the 50% to 90% fake follower and friend range on Twitter and Facebook. On the surface, this seems harmless. Unfortunately they often sell marketing outreach as part of their services, and if the majority of their social media following is either purchased or inactive, they may be perpetrating a fraud, which is both unethical and illegal. And if a company is willing to promote a fake social media base, how else might they be deceiving their clients?

See our earlier article on why you should never use a fake social media following.

Fake social media followings are primarily composed of dummy accounts in non-English-speaking nations. These will do absolutely nothing to promote your business. Both Twitter and Facebook are well aware of the problem and attempt to crack down on the practice, but they simply cannot keep up with the pace of people who either sell or buy social media followings. Even the highest ranking people in the nation employ some level of fake social media.

Here are easy ways to spot a useless social media following:

Analyze the Account – A number of free tools are available, such a TwitterAudit for Twitter accounts and LikeAnalyzer for Facebook pages, that will provide measurements of fake social media followers. There are many other free options on the Internet. Try a few. You will be astounded by the results produced by some of your favorite companies, celebrities, and service providers.

Unbalanced Following-to-Follower Ratio – Twitter is built on reciprocity, which means that most of the people who follow you are followed back in return by you. The same goes for “likes” on Facebook, although this is much more difficult to track. Since Twitter is superior for marketing (i.e. Facebook is superior for customer interaction), check the following-to-follower ratio of a prospective business. A healthy Twitter account has about an 80% or better following-to-follower ratio. This means that the account is following almost as many people who follow the account. If you see many followers and few accounts followed in return, look closer at what this person or account is doing.

Few Number of Impressions or Reaches – Twitter activity is often gauged by the number of impressions a post garners, while Facebook is measured by the number of people reached. Often this data is internal to the account holder, but there are a number of aftermarket metrics to determine these values. Another way to gauge social media viability is through the number of likes and retweets on Twitter and the number of likes and shares on Facebook, although these speak more to furthering outreach than relevance to their initial social media base.

The questionable practice of employing a fake social media following falls into the “snake oil” category, recalling the days when charlatans circled the country with magic elixirs that claimed to cure all ills. The Internet is proving to be more like the Wild West than we ever knew. Hiring a fake social media following can be more than a waste of time. It can be dangerous to your limited marketing budget, and it puts into question everything the account holder does as a company.

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